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British Columbians don't want another 'frog' on the lily pad
  Feb 17, 2004

A random telephone survey of 314 respondents in the Greater Vancouver City district, between February 14-18, 2004. All respondents were pre-qualified to be voters in both the last provincial general election in British Columbia (2001), and the last federal election (2000). The survey features a margin of error of 2%-5% 17 times out of 20, at 96% competency.

Question #1
Through most of the last thirty-five years, Canada has been led by a Prime Minister who comes from Quebec. In your opinion would it be appropriate now for Canadians to select a Prime Minister from another part of Canada? Yes-82% No-18%
Question #2
Which province in Canada is Prime Minister Paul Martin from? A. Ontario-77% B. Quebec-23%
Question #3
In your opinion, does the expression "the leopard doesn't change his spots," generally hold true? Yes-48% No-52%
Question #4
Which of the following circumstances most annoys you? A. Jean Chretien spends two billion dollars on a gun registry supposed to cost two million dollars-72%; B. Jean Chretien and Paul Martin give away 100 million dollars to Quebec to buy votes and launder money back to their own political party-16%; C. A Conservative Party MP takes $300,000 from unsuspecting investors which he uses to satisfy his cocaine addiction-06%; D. New York talk show host Conan O'Brien directs his talking dog 'Triumph' to make fun of Quebecers for not fighting in World War II-02%; E. I don't know-04%.
Commentary
Western Canadians have little idea where Prime Minister Paul Martin is from. If he is from Quebec, which is he, they would like someone from another province. This is unlikely to happen as Quebec and Ontario continue to conspire to screw over the rest of the country

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